“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” Edmund Burke’s words serve as a solemn reminder that we have a responsibility to be an advocate for those whose voice is not heard. As awareness of this injustice grows, we are realizing that the issue of human trafficking is more than a political, geographic or religious problem. Human trafficking affects everyone and is by definition a “human” problem. 

“Trafficking in Persons” take places when the vulnerabilities of one person are exploited by another for commercial gain. More specifically, this modern day slavery exists when people are coerced, forced, and/or manipulated to do commercial sex acts or labor services against their will. Whether they are forced to work as a truck stop prostitute, a “masseuse” at an asian massage parlor, a nanny for a wealthy family, a brick maker in India, or a worker on a fishing boat in Southeast Asia, they are victims of exploitation. This injustice is not limited to developing nations, however. Quite to the contrary, every nation is affected and impacted by this violation of human rights.

With only drug trafficking surpassing it, human trafficking has become the second largest and the fastest growing criminal enterprise in the world. Approximately 27 million slaves are at work in the world today. Even in the US, many of them are enslaved in plain sight. As a matter of fact, the United States is second only to Germany as a top destination country for human trafficking.  

Already known for ethnic diversity, NYC is also gaining a reputation as a destination for victims of human trafficking. According to recent reports, “Queens, New York is emerging as an epicenter of human trafficking in the United States.” 

Along Roosevelt Avenue, a main thoroughfare in Queens, one will find illegitimate massage parlors, men passing out cards with the number of a local residential brothel, as well as vans serving as mobile bordellos. For this very reason, local church leaders and civic leaders from all over Queens gathered in the Corona neighborhood on August 24th to discover what they could do to help turn the tide. With the desire to bring awareness to human trafficking, “Let My People Go” served to inspire and equip local churches to be the answer to the ever-growing exploitation in Queens. The panel made up of NYC’s top Christian abolitionists dealt with how to identify and respond to human trafficking in a Gospel-centered manner. 

Testifying to witnessing prostitution within blocks of his church, the pastor of Iglesia Bautista Canaan, Juan Carlos Suero, told those in attendance that exploitation is a dangerous reality in his neighborhood. He continued to explain that he felt that his church was to be part of the solution.

As Pastor Juan Carlos recognized, God desires to use the local church to bring justice to the vulnerable. Jimmy Lee, the executive director of Restore NYC, an aftercare facility for foreign born victims, reminded those in attendance that “in every neighborhood where a woman is trafficked in NYC, there is a church that can be eyes and ears.” Lee reminded those listening that as they see red flags, they “can call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1888-373-7888.”

Whether you live in Queens, NYC or Tulsa, Oklahoma, you must remember that before you can care for victims, you must first realize that they exist. Growing in our awareness is the first step toward bringing freedom to our communities. 

With that said, you do not have to wear a cape or have a Phd to be an advocate for the weak and vulnerable. God desires to use each of us. Though exploitation takes place everywhere, God is also sovereignly placing His church in every community in the world. The local church is God’s answer to the hurting all around us.  

Now as you read this article, you maybe be saying to yourself, “What can I do? This problem is too big. Why should I even try?” Edmund Burke, a member of the British Parliament in the late 1700s, who stood for the cause of the American Colonies understood the need for freedom, even when it was not popular or easy. He explained that “nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could do only a little.” Regardless of your age or your occupation, you can do something. As you begin to be aware of the exploitation that takes place around you, you are in the perfect position to care for the weak and vulnerable. Remember that the only thing necessary for you to fight human trafficking is to be a disciple that shows your love for God by the way that you love others.